Android 12.1 will rolling out a new AOSP wallpaper after nearly 5 years

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“The sky is not pink”, peruses the title of a code change Google has recently submitted inside to the Android Open Source Project (AOSP) Gerrit. The code change replaces the default “pink sky” wallpaper that Google previously acquainted with the open source version of Android almost 5 years prior.

In its place is another wallpaper that is set to make a big appearance with the arrival of Android 12.1, Android’s first point discharge in quite a while, and we at XDA have, obviously, acquired this wallpaper in front of the OS’s release.

By far most of clients have probably never seen the “pink sky” wallpaper that has been remembered for open source arrivals of Android since Android 7.0 Nougat. That is on the grounds that practically every cell phone that runs Android is really running a modified form of it, which for the most part never transports the default AOSP wallpaper seen beneath.

You’ll likely possibly see the wallpaper in case you’re running a product work with light adjustments to AOSP, for example, one of the AOSP-put together custom ROMs with respect to the XDA Forums or a Generic System Image (GSI). Beginning with the open source arrival of Android 12.1, however, you’ll probably be seeing an different wallpaper.

In case you’re keen on downloading the AOSP backdrop from Android renditions 7.0-12 in its original resolution, you can do as such from here. Assuming you need to download the new Android 12.1 backdrop in its original resolution.

Android 12.1 is relied upon to fall in the middle of Android 12 and Android 13. The steady arrival of Android 12 is relied upon to dispatch on October fourth, as per our sources, while Android 13 is relied upon to dispatch at some point in the fall of 2022.

The Android 12.1 point discharge, in the interim, will be joined by a knock in the API level, which is strange as we haven’t had a platform-changing maintenance release since Android 8.1 Oreo in 2017. We don’t by and large have the foggiest idea why Google is chipping away at a point discharge, yet there are a few subtleties XDA can share soon.