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Alcohol is never healthy for those under 40, according to a global research

Alcohol is never healthy for those under 40, according to a global research
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According to the largest study of its kind, alcohol has serious health hazards and has no benefits for young people, although some older adults may benefit from a small quantity of consumption.

The Global Burden of Diseases study, an ongoing initiative centred at the University of Washington in Seattle that generates the most thorough data on the global causes of illness and death, came to this result.

The study from four years ago suggested that governments should counsel people to completely abstain from alcohol and that even the occasional drink was unhealthy for their health.

But the study’s authors have come to new conclusions following a significant new investigation of worldwide data. According to them, drinking alcohol poses more health dangers to young people than to older adults. However, they note that those over 40 who are healthy may benefit from modest alcohol intake, such as one small glass of red wine per day, including a decreased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and stroke.

They are the first to disclose alcohol risk by age, sex, year, and geographical region in their findings, which were published in the Lancet. They propose that global alcohol consumption recommendations should be based on geography and age, with the highest recommendations for men between the ages of 15 and 39, who are most at risk of consuming alcohol harmfully globally.

scientist, said, “Our message is simple: young people should not drink, but older people may benefit from drinking small amounts.” While it may not be realistic to think young adults will abstain from drinking, we do think it’s important to communicate the latest evidence so that everyone can make informed decisions about their health.”

A study of drinking habits in 204 countries estimates that 1.34 billion people worldwide drank alcohol in harmful amounts in 2020.

According to the study, which was published in the Lancet, 15 to 39-year-olds made up 59% of those who drank excessively. For these individuals, alcohol had no positive effects on health and instead presented risks, such as injuries from drunk driving or other accidents, suicides, or murders. Men made up % of dangerous drinkers.

Using data from the 2020 Global Burden of Disease, researchers examined the impact of alcohol intake on 22 health outcomes, such as injuries, cancers, and cardiovascular illnesses.

With the aid of this knowledge, the researchers were able to calculate the maximum amount of alcohol a person may consume without endangering their health in excess compared to a person who did not consume any alcohol.

They discovered that the level of alcohol that could be ingested over the course of a lifetime without increasing health hazards rose. Researchers defined a normal drink as a 375ml can or bottle of 3.5 percent beer or a 100ml glass of red wine with a 13.5% alcohol content.

They discovered that the acceptable daily intake of alcohol for men between the ages of 15 and 39 was merely 0.136 standard drinks. The “theoretical minimum risk exposure level” was 0.273 drinks for women of the same age, or around a standard drink per day.

Drinking a very little alcohol has been related to various health benefits for persons 40 and older who are otherwise healthy, such as lowering the risk of ischemic heart disease, stroke, and diabetes.

Safe alcohol intake levels for people 40 to 64 years of age ranged from roughly half a standard drink per day to over two standard drinks. The hazards of “health loss from alcohol consumption” for people 65 and older were achieved after having little more than three standard drinks per day.

However, the average daily alcohol intake for people over the age of 40 remained modest, with a high of 1.87 standard drinks. The Lancet reported that after that, the health hazards grew with each drink.

Drinking a very little alcohol has been related to various health benefits for persons 40 and older who are otherwise healthy, such as lowering the risk of ischemic heart disease, stroke, and diabetes.

Safe alcohol intake levels for people 40 to 64 years of age ranged from roughly half a standard drink per day to over two standard drinks. The risks of “health loss from alcohol consumption” for people 65 and older were reached after having little more than three standard drinks per day.

However, the average daily alcohol intake for people over the age of 40 remained modest, with a high of 1.87 standard drinks. The Lancet reported that after that, the health hazards grew with each drink.

Topics #Alcohol #cardiovascular illnesses #Diseases #global research
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